Archive for February, 2017

McKenzie Worldwide Joins PDX Cyber Camp Sponsor List

Monday, February 20th, 2017
Students in class working on desktop computer

PDX Cyber Camp helps prepare students for employment in the rapidly growing field of cybersecurity.

McKenzie Worldwide is proud to be a sponsor again of this year’s PDX Cyber Camp which is focused on providing motivated high school students with a hands-on, introductory experience to cybersecurity principles, including hands-on implementation of cybersecurity policies and practices in Windows and Ubuntu operating systems. We’re also particularly excited about the camp’s “Girls Only” session which hopes to inspire young women to pursue rewarding and high-paying technical careers in cybersecurity.

Lincoln High School’s Coding Club and EnergySec are a driving force behind the cybersecurity camp which is organized and managed by a team of high school students, educators and industry professionals. This year, Pacific Star Communications, Inc. (PacStar) is the Title Sponsor of the 2017 PDX Cyber Camp which is great news! PacStar provides specialized hardware and software solutions for military and commercial customers requiring reliable 24/7 advanced communications so cybersecurity is very important to them.

Cybersecurity is one of today’s hottest technical fields, with some experts forecasting a shortage of up to 1 million of trained professionals in the coming years. Careers in cybersecurity can be incredibly rewarding, high-paying, and are in demand worldwide in just about every industry.

Camp Details:
• Date: Monday July 17th through Friday July 21st, 2017
• Camp Times: Full day camp.
• Camp Reception: Thursday, July 20th
• Location #1, (Girls Only) Lincoln High School, 1600 SW Salmon St, Portland, OR 97205, Room #223
• Location #2, (Co-Ed), Center for Advanced Learning, 1484 NW Civic Dr., Gresham, OR 97030
• Location #3 (Co-Ed): Mentor Graphics, 8005 Boeckman Rd, Wilsonville, Oregon
• Cost: $150. Scholarships available based on financial need.
• Food: Lunches provided.
• The camp facility supports a maximum of 30 students, and will be limited to that size so each student will have a dedicated computer system.

Curriculum and Highlights:
• Introduction to cybersecurity and ethics
• Introduction to VMware Player
• Hands on security configuration of Windows and Ubuntu operating systems
• Mock cyber competition
• Guest speakers from leading cybersecurity companies
• Networking reception with security business professionals

Instruction will be provided by industry cyber security experts as well as advanced students, and/or instructors from educational organizations. Each student will have their own dedicated high-performance computer during the class, which includes extensive labs.

The program will include guest speakers with deep experience in cybersecurity technologies and careers. 2016 speakers included cyber incident responders, malware analysts and cybersecurity researchers from Lockheed Martin (Leidos), RSA, Intel Security, Galois and PacStar.

By participating in the camp, students will receive valuable experience that can help them qualify for cybersecurity internships at local companies. Three students on the 2016 organizing team of this camp landed internships at cyber and network security companies in Portland.

The PDX Cyber Camp is non-profit and volunteer driven. All proceeds and sponsorships go only towards direct expenses such as curriculum, supplies, and outreach expense.

Apply for the camp now by visiting this link:

http://bit.ly/pdxcyber

Tek Pulse: Science news you can use to build your brand

Thursday, February 2nd, 2017

Editor’s Note: This a reposting of the Tek Pulse, a regular blog roundup of the latest and greatest science news McKenzie Worldwide puts together for our client Tektronix. Blog features like this are an affordable way to build your company’s social presence and drive traffic to your website. Drop us a line to learn how we can do the same for you.

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1. Can the donut-shaped magnet ‘CAPPuccino submarine’ hunt for dark matter? Institute for basic science, January 23, 2017, EurekAlert – Scientists have taken a big step forward in the hunt for dark matter. Everything we see accounts for just four percent of the Universe, the rest is dark energy and dark matter. However, we have never been able to directly detect dark matter. One possible dark matter particle is an axion, but special technology is needed to catch their presence. Currently, scientists in South Korea are in the process of building such technology, using haloscopes. Haloscopes contain resonant cavities immersed in an extra-strong magnetic field. The magnets in the haloscopes are the most important feature and in order to find the axion, the team had to develop a new kind of magnet shaped like a donut, called toroidal magnets. The next step is to develop and prototype new machines in the hunt for dark matter.  For the full article check out EurekAlert.

2. New design strategy for longer lasting batteries, Amanda Morris, January 23, 2017, TechXplore –With every charge and discharge cycle on a smartphone its battery capacity decreases, eventually rendering the device useless. In most cases, this degradation is due to the cathode in the device. Now a professor at Northwestern’s McCormick School of Engineering has developed a solution. He created a computational design strategy that can pinpoint optimal materials to coat the cathode in lithium-ion batteries, thus extending the device’s battery and its life. The coatings could provide a barrier around the cathode to prevent degradation from hydrofluoric acid or may react positively with the acid so there’s none left to harm the cathode. The bottom line is, using computation as a design strategy quickly narrows down the potential materials to a manageable number to test experimentally, which will result in the accelerated development of many new materials in the future. For more information visit TechXplore.

3. Highly entertaining: Algorithm watches movie trailer and identifies objects in real time, Heather Hamilton, January 23, 2017, Electronic Products – Recent improvements have increased the speed and accuracy that algorithms can successfully identify objects. Now, a new algorithm called Yolo-2 (Yolo is an acronym for You Only Look Once) can identify multiple objects within the same image. A team of researchers developed and tested their algorithm on the “Wolf of Wall Street” movie trailer with a threshold of .15, meaning the algorithm will only react to objects detected with a confidence of 15 percent or higher. The team claims that Yolo-2 has many advantages over similar systems. For instance, it can look at the entire image so its predictions are informed by global context in the image and Yolo-2 is 100 to 1,000 times faster than other algorithms. For the full story check out Electronic Products.

4. Ultrafast Camera Captures ‘Sonic Booms’ of Light for First Time, Charles Q. Choi, January 20, 2017, LiveScience – A new superfast camera has captured the first ever video of sonic booms. Sonic booms are cone-shaped wakes of light or “Mach Cones.” Sonic booms are created by events like an aircraft flying at supersonic speeds. To capture video of the event, an optical engineer and colleagues at Washington University in St. Louis developed a “streak camera” that could capture images at speeds of 100 billion frames per second in a single exposure. There are other imaging systems that can capture ultrafast events, but they require hundreds, or even thousands, of exposures before they can see them. This new system, on the other hand, can record such events in one exposure. The team says their technique could be useful for recording events in complex biomedical contexts, such as watching neurons fire and to image live traffic in the brain. For more information visit LiveScience.

5. And lastly, the most popular Tektronix download of the week goes to – Worldwide Spectrum Allocations Poster. For all the International Frequency Allocations, right at your fingertips, download this colorful poster.

Download your copy today!


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