Posts Tagged ‘Mobile’

The Paperless Office…In Our Lifetime?

Wednesday, July 31st, 2013

logo_aiimIt seems like we’ve heard about the paperless office for many years now. Will it happen in our lifetime? Well, your guess is as good as mine. Our friends at AIIM just published a very interesting report about how companies are incorporating paper-free projects into their business. What I find interesting about the report, Winning the Paper Wars, are the reasons for and against going paper-free.

Many of the companies involved in the research indicated that their legal departments and some executives are not comfortable using 5-more-simple-tools-for-a-paperless-office-508f814ec9electronic signatures and electronic documents due to legal issues. The reality is that e-signatures and e-docs are 100 percent admissible in court. Conversely, the growth of mobile workers and mobile devices/applications has helped spur the need for the paper-less work environment.

mobile worker - man on his phone and laptop in a fieldFor those who work in PR and marketing, do you find that your clients like to publicize the fact that they are paper-free or that they’re using workflow and business process technology to reduce the use of paper and increase worker productivity? From a business perspective it makes a lot of sense to go this route, but does it help from a communications standpoint?

Customer experience and mobile e-commerce sites

Monday, July 29th, 2013

I’m not exactly what you call a shopaholic but I do enjoy shopping online since it saves me a lot of time. Get in, get out, done. Viola! So the other day I was reading e-Spirit’s Content Unlocked blog and came across some statistics created by research firm Invesp that jumped out at me. According to Invesp, the top 10 U.S. online retailers by unique monthly visits are:

retailers

OK, no surprise there.

But what really caught my eye was that Invesp predicted that “mobile devices will account for 15% of the total U.S. online retail sales in 2013, which is estimated to reach 25% by 2017.” Wow! I realize that we’re living in a mobile world and that most people have smartphones or iPads or other handheld devices, but talk about multi-tasking! Now I can walk down the street, talk on my smartphone and receive an alert from one of my favorite retailers about a sale item.

The key issue to me is how can retailers duplicate the easy-to-view, easy-to-navigate style of their web sites and shift them over to very mobile shoppingsmall handheld devices? For example, I subscribe to ESPN’s publications and am constantly checking for updates on their web site. However, when I’m using my smartphone I get so frustrated when I click on a specific login area and it sends me somewhere else by accident. Or when I try to expand a page with two fingers and I accidentally click on another link. It drives me nuts!

The point I’m trying to make here is that retailers know that their e-commerce sites are very easy to use on a computer, but they must make sure that they use a powerful content management system to ensure that I get the same experience (it’s all about the customer experience) regardless of whether I’m in their store, on their web site, or viewing them on my smartphone. Sounds simple but you’d be surprised how many people I’ve talked with who have had the same type of negative experiences that I have on other retailer’s sites.

What do you find most annoying when you’re trying to navigate an e-commerce site when you’re using a mobile device?

 

 

Know when it’s time to hit the reset button

Monday, February 15th, 2010

Nothing lasts forever.  Not even cash cows.

In the fast moving technology world, standing still with old technology is a sure recipe for failure. Or as an old boss used to say, you can put lipstick on the pig, but it’s still a pig.

Unfortunately, there are way too many examples of companies that once were on top but failed to realize, until it was too late, that technology had marched on and their once groundbreaking, industry leading technology had become obsolete.  The tech industry is littered with examples of computing giants that bit the dust by resting on their laurels.

One that impacted me was Digital Equipment Corp.  While the movement toward open operating systems and PCs was in full swing, DEC chairman Ken Olsen called Unix “snake oil” and derided PCs as little more than toys.  That was until PC maker Compaq swallowed him up and shut down the DEC brand. (more…)


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